OpenCDISC

OpenCDISC is now called Pinnacle 21

November 23, 2015

OpenCDISC has begun a rebranding process. The first step in that process, effective immediately, is that our organization will no longer be using the name “OpenCDISC” for any product, service or event.

Going forward, OpenCDISC Community will now be known as Pinnacle 21 Community; and OpenCDISC Enterprise will now be known as Pinnacle 21 Enterprise.

Why? After many years of mutual support and understanding, the CDISC organization has asked us to stop using the name “OpenCDISC.”

What does this mean to you? Ultimately, nothing. The staff at Pinnacle 21 will continue to develop our open source software and make it available to all, free of charge. And we will continue to help and support our users as we always have.

CDISC ADaM Validation Webinar — Recap

June 25, 2015

When CDISC published Version 1.3 of its ADaM Validation Rules, a lot of you wondered what to make of it.

According to CDISC: “Some checks have been reworded for clarification … [and] 75 new checks have been added to cover rules not previously addressed. [These] additional checks cover the addition of checks for Adverse Events (ADAE) and the ADaM Basic Data Structure for Time-to-Event Analyses (BDS-TTE).”

To paint a clear picture of what all this means, and how the industry should respond, Pinnacle 21 hosted a recent webinar on this topic. The webinar — titled, “ADaM Validation Update from OpenCDISC” — provided an overview of these changes, and shared our experience of the most common issues in ADaM submission data observed across the industry.

The History of OpenCDISC

February 24, 2015

In the Beginning

It was late 2007. Mad Men was the hottest show on TV. The BlackBerry was still the most popular smartphone. Senator Barack Obama was securing his party’s nomination for the next presidential election. And a young clinical data exchange specialist named Max Kanevsky was contemplating the future of the biopharmaceutical industry.

During his tenure at Merck, Max had been responsible for integrating the company with many external partners (e.g., laboratories, CROs, joint ventures, technology providers), working with many non-standardized sources of data. Though the norm, gathering all that disparate data and mapping it into Merck’s internal standard was a huge challenge. When the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) started to make headway in its mission to develop a global set of standards, it marked a new beginning. CDISC would eventually define the standards for the entire industry.

But Max wondered how sponsors would possibly manage such a sea-change. At the time, software options to help ensure a submission’s compliance with FDA business rules were limited. WebSDM offered limited performance and capabilities, at a price point that was prohibitive to many. Meanwhile, Max was helping Merck with its early manual implementations of CDISC standards, including LAB, ODM and SDTM, which were difficult and time consuming. And each new challenge provided an obstacle that could threaten FDA approval of any given drug. There had to be a better way. But what?